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are fueling new suspicion and outrage about pakistan's links to the taliban. is a key u.s. ally playing a role in the deaths of american troops? i'm going to ask pakistan's ambassador to the u.s. about these disturbing allegations. >>> and the case of the disappearing oil. why officials in the gulf say they are not finding much crude left on the water surface? wolf blitzer is off today. i'm suzanne malveaux and you're in "the situation room." >>> well, some are calling it one of the biggest leaks in u.s. military history. in the league of the pentagon papers. those revelations about the vietnam war. but today the white house contends that there isn't much new in the thousands of afghan war logs posted online by the group wikileaks. some powerful members of congress, well, they're not so sure. they say the documents raised some serious questions about u.s. policy toward afghanistan and neighboring pakistan. i want to begin with our senior white house correspondent ed henry and what was startling and what was -- stood out in my mind when i saw the white house today was that they are not saying t
to these documents as being rather low level classified information that any number of u.s. service members could have access to, but it's obviously something that the pentagon is quite concerned about, that this has now been made public for people all over the world to see, shannon. shannon: with that in mind, mike, what are we hearing from wickileaks about this massive release of classified information, any hint that we should expect more to come? >> reporter: the founder did say, shannon, they have about 15,000 other documents that they have not yet released and he predicted that there would be more leaks to come as well. so all indications are that he is waiting for the right opportunity to get maximum media exposure. it's quite clear that this guy is clearly antiwar and trying to undermine support for the war and a lot of the key countries' contributing troops to the afghan effort. here's more from the wickileaks founder earlier today. >> the coverup, all sorts of crimes, begins at the bottom and moves its way to the top so it is quite hard to enact a new policy and have it filtered down to
of 91,000 reports on the events that intern lit u.s. military considered significant. >> robert gibbs at the white house and others at the pentagon, robert gates, have said this has the potential to harm u.s. service people. does that concern you? >> well, anything in theory has boat tension to harm anything else but we have looked that the material for some months now together with our media partners. we have taken some steps to understand that material is at least seven months ago, so, it is -- it is not of any sort of a tactical significance. our primary concern with people being potentially harmed was to do with afghan informants who could have been under the risk of retribution action. that is why we held back some 15,000 reports for a more detailed review. >> there is a lot of questions your view toward the war. you were quoted saying you enjoyed crushing bastards. is that an accurate reflection of your attitude toward the establishment, toward the people running the war, toward the u.s. government? >> well, wikileaks is a publication by the sunshine press. we are an organizatio
blitzer takes us through the next hours. >>> rick, thanks very much. happening now, questions for u.s. troops about gays serving openly in the united states military. we have new information this hour about a brand new survey that could influence plans to repeal don't ask don't tell. >>> plus, some of the alleged russian spies now on the move amid reports that the u.s. may swap them for agents held by moscow. >>> and what could liberal democrat barney frank and libertarian conservative republican ron paul possibly agree on? find out when two of the most outspoken and provocative members of congress team up right here. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> up first, a key step toward allowing gays to serve openly in the united states military. today the pentagon began sending out a formal survey to all u.s. troops about plans to repeal the don't ask don't tell policy. let's bring in our pentagon correspondent barbara starr. she is working this story. it's only a matter of time, barbara, until gays are allowed to serve openly according to the president but this is an imp
for water and other projects. clinton's trip comes as richard haas tells news week that the u.s. needs to rethink afghanistan. that we're not winning and it's not worth it. he is suggesting a drawdown of troops. after nine years of war, continued involvement in afghanistan isn't likely to yield lasting improvements. it is time to scale down our ambition there and reduce and redirect what we do. >> others say that is not the time to leave. >> it's very difficult conflict. it will take a long time, sometimes hard for americans to swallow, but the notion that we can afford effectively to pull out causes risks and dangers for the united states down the road that are just almost impossible to quantify. >> reporter: it sounds like what secretary clinton will be arguing in kabul on tuesday. >> gregg: the search is on for right now for carjackers that killed an off-duty police officer in chicago. officer michael bailey was killed on his way home from work early this morning. 20 year veteran just two weeks from retirement, police say the shooting occurred when two men tried to steal his buick s
using shoulder-fired heat-seeking missiles to shoot down u.s. helicopters and other air crafts. these missiles helped afghan guerillas defeat the soviet occupation in the 19el 80s. there were a huge number of civilians caught in the cross fire in land and air operations and also seek let u.s. commando raids against taliban leaders, some successful, others resulting in civilian deaths. >>> again, one of the most devastating points in these documents is the allegation that pakistan's spy agency is supplying weapons, training and even planning some operations for the afghan taliban. now, on friday, i spoke with matt waldman, this is before these wikileaks were made. matt waldman is an independent analyst who, through his own research, has come to the same conclusion about pakistan's intelligence agency, helping the taliban. he has visited afghanistan numerous times, and interviewed taliban field commanders, taliban officials, foreign diplomats, and other analysts. here's part of what he told us. >> well, this is research that we conducted over six months, and as you say, we interv
right. mike viqueira on the white house lawn, thanks very much. >>> new reports of just how much the u.s. paid that iranian scientist for secrets of iran's nuclear program. jim miklaszewski joins us from the pentagon. mick, the numbers are staggering. the cia paid $5 million and one report said offered him $50 million to not return to iran. do we know how true the report is? >> reporter: the claim from the iranian nuclear scientist himself and no basis to that fact but u.s. officials confirm that the cia paid this nuclear scientist $5 million after the scientist defected to the united states but he's now returning to teheran. good news here according to u.s. officials is this person cannot get the hands on that money. he returned to teheran overnight a hero's welcome and reunion with his wife and son who may have been in danger back there in iran but the money is in frozen accounts controlled by the u.s. government for the time being. one of the big questions here, chuck, is once sanctions if they're ever lifted on iran would he then have the ability to get at that $5 million? but there'
today, but what is the legacy of the u.s. team from this year's tournament? >>> real-life drama, hollywood stars are taking their acts to courtrooms near you. why do so many have run-ins with the law? >>> good morning, everyone. i'm alex witt. welcome to "msnbc sudden." developing right now, after two years on the run, allegedly stealing cars, boats and planes, gaining fame and fans along the way, police have finally caught up with the 19-year-old known as the barefoot bandit. colton harris-moore was arrested in the wee hours this morning in the bahamas, he's been on the run since 2008 when he left a halfway house in washington. he crashed a plane last week in the bahamas and police picked him up after a boat chase in harbor island. nbc's peter alexander is in the bahamas and joins us on the phone with how all this went down. good morning, peter. >> good morning to you. that chase apparently, according to bahamian police, happened on a boat. they were chasing him by boat today when they ultimately arrested colton harris-moore. he is the so-called barefoot bandit, according to au
as we go about it. it is simply vast. no u.s. airline has bought the airliner yet. to answer your really important question, airbus has written off the majority of the money that it costs to design, develop and build it and they told me today they expect the new planes being built will break even by 2014 because they've written off the old debt. it's huge. >> it's a good sign for the economy when people are shopping for airplanes. you remember at the brink of the recession, fewer people were showing up at these things. >> reporter: yeah. and the really important thing, of course, that plane right in the middle, the 787, which is making its debut outside the united states, the dreamliner, that has sold 863 of them. that tells you the importance, not only for the puget sound and the northwestern united states but right through the midwest, through to chicago where boeing has its headquarters. the industry that builds that plane is crucial. that's why that plane is the star of this show. >> richard, come and visit us again. richard quest at the farnborough air show in england. good to see y
believe it or not over the next 24 hours. jon: back here in the u.s., a tornado watch in effect in the upper midwest. the national weather service saying parts of minnesota and north dakota could be in the path of some very dangerous storms. rick reichmuth in the fox extreme weather center for us now. >> reporter: watching this line of storms really develop this morning, moving across, as you said, minnesota into wisconsin, we have a moderate risk of severe weather but this line right there, as it continues to move very quickly through the area, will see that of that severe weather, the tornado watch in effect until 4:00 p.m. and we'll see more weather again as the day heats up again behind this storm. here's a look at where that severe threat is, you can see this red area is the bull's eye, the yellow area, a slight risk, that extends towards the panhandle of oklahoma, in towards texas. but that moderate risk area is likely where we could see any of the tornadoes today. certainly very significant wind damage at times. the other story that we're dealing with across the country a
,951 miles, the entire u.s./mexican border. so that's one-third of the border has this fence. so the way to compare it, if you have a fence in your backyard, and only covers a third of your backyard, things are going to get in and out and that's what proponents are saying, they want more fence, a stronger fence. so we kind of did a story of what it's like along the border. and what we found with no knowledge at all about how to sneak into a country, we found it was very easy to go back and forth between mexico and the ups at various points. not only where the fence is, because people climb over the fence, they weld holes through the fence, go under the fence, but we found points where you just walk around the fence. and while there are certainly hard-working border patrol agents everywhere and technology and also mountainous terrain, it's very easy for a novice, such as me, to go around the fence and go back and forth between the country. so there are a number of people here in arizona who are telling us, listen, we support this law that takes effect thursday, but perhaps we wouldn't nee
, but supporting the taliban in their attacks on afghan and u.s. military forces inside afghanistan. what is interesting, however, while washington is focused on that aspect of the documents, in a news conference with julian esange, the founder of wikileaks in london today, the discussion was all about war crimes. he said that was in part the driving force behind his publishing these leaked documents in trying to, what he said essentially, change or i suspect, end the course of the war there in afghanistan. >> is the pentagon pushing back hard on these allegations of war crimes? >> they are not, actually. they are going to take their time and say it could take days or weeks before they pore over all these documents to determine what is real, hypothetical and what is just plain false. they are not jumping into any conclusions here about the documents themselves. they, too, of course are condemning the release as national security advisor jim jones did. in fact, claiming that it puts american men and women on the ground. afghan forces, and something more importantly, some of the local afgha
. lawmakers there are expected to make recommendations on milk prices later today. jenna: the u.s. census is providing a much-needed lifeline for hundreds of thousands of americans looking for work and now these temporary jobs are ending. unemployment remains stubbornly high despite the president's stimulus program. so there's a lot going on. steve centanni is live for us in washington. steve, tell us a little bit about what's different this year, about the census employment picture? >> reporter: well, jennifer, one thing are no hurry to leave their jobs with the census. in the past the census employees often gave early notice they were leaving so they could move on, take better jobs with better wages, but this year, there really aren't many jobs out there with the unemployment rate at 9.5%, so these employees are staying on the job as long as they can. but those jobs are rapidly disappearing. in fact, so many people left their census jobs in june, they were laid off, that the jobless numbers for both overall payroll employment and for government employment reflected that decline. the lab
for now, the big telethon, individuals in the u.s. meanwhile have pledged around $1.3 billion. you see the numbers, how much has been pledged and actually how much has been handed over and delivered there. a lot of aid has made it to haiti but 1.5 million people still homeless. some of the people in need the most or in need of most are falling through the cracks. that's the case at one orphanage it was visited by our dr. sanjay gupta. ♪ >> reporter: it is so striking in orphanages, smiles amid squalor. 350,000 orphans in haiti. best guess. many, like this little guy, don't even have a name. don't know how old he is. he's an orphan in this orphanage. among lots of other children. 40 to 50 at any given time. that's how many kids are taken care of. let me show you something else as well. look at this particular building. you just look at the floor over here. that's where they sleep. there are no bedrooms. find a place and sleep for the night. this is the kitchen. for all those children. this pot of beans is their food for the entire day. simply not enough. you take a look. they have to
endorse it. >>> to our top story. the u.s. military says hundreds of american troops are searching for two navy sailors who disappeared in a taliban stronghold in eastern afghanistan on friday. yesterday, the taliban claimed they killed one of the sailors and took the other one as a prisoner, after both were forced from their armored sport utility vehicle. however, nato officials have not confirmed the reports and still characterize the men as missing. there are also conflicting reports about whether the body of one of the two has been recovered. the war in afghanistan also getting attention this morning by the release of the more than 90,000 classified field reports i mentioned. they were made public by an organization that says its goal in disclosing secret documents is to reveal unethical behavior by governments and corporations now, the documents span from january of 2004 -- from 2004 to january of this year, and paint a bleak picture of the situation on the ground there. according to "the new york times" one of the news organizations that was granted early access to the reports, they
a thrilling story out of a spy novel itself. and it seemed like the priority here was u.s./russia relations. the question outstanding is what kind of threat does russia pose with its espionage against the united states? >> let's step back for a second and understand that i think this is a great credit to our law enforcement. we made arrests, law enforcement community made arrests. these individuals have been monitored for quite some time. they tried but they never got classified information and intelligence. and now they've left the country, which again is a big win for our law enforcement community. i set that aside. i think our relationship with russia is no doubt improving if you look at where it was just a few years ago. the economic discussions that were had recently and progress made in reducing nuclear weapons and hopefully we'll get a treaty through senate this summer that will further reduce nuclear weapons means our security is stronger and safer and our relationship is stronger. >> more broadly on foreign policy. i can remember back two years ago as you can july of 2008 the presi
of reverse racism at the u.s. department of agriculture, as with newshour political editor david chalian, the administration apologizes to a fired employee. >> lehrer: plus, a tom bearden oil spill report on the dispute over how to block the flow of oil into threatened tidal estuaries in louisiana. >> woodruff: and, on this 60th anniversary of north korea's attack on the south, jeffrey brown revisits that first hot conflict of the cold war, and explores its continuing legacy with warren wiedhahn, a u.s. marine veteran of the war, plus historians michael beschloss and alex roland. that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: the campaign to toughen financi
from the pentagon. mick, such a fascinating story. iran claimed this scientist was abducted. the u.s. says that isn't what happened. what's going on here? >> savannahs, even in the an nals of spydom this sister roy is somewhat bizarre. this iranian nuclear scientist, shar ran amiri disappeared with a year ago. he turned up here in the u.s. where he reportedly shared some of the secrets of iran's nuclear weapons program with u.s. government officials. iran claimed as you said that amiri had actually been kidnapped and tortured by the cia. but even as late as yesterday, secretary of state hillary clinton denied that saying amir riff here of his own free will and could leave at any time. all that played out as amiri showed up at the iranian intersection here in washington earlier this week saying he wanted to return to iran and as far as we know, he is on his way this morning. what makes this case strange is over the course of the past several months, amiri released three videos, one saying he was kidnapped and tortured, the second saying he was attending graduate school voluntarily in
the u.s. government thinks the group launched a successful attack outside somalia. the group of now has the ability to strike u.s. targets. the sex of homeland security put congress in may and were warned there was a significant risk of a trying during the matches. so to suggest there were no warnings whatsoever really is not accurate. >> shepard: all right. cathrine herridge in washington. good to see you. thank you. >> he was a member of iran's elite revolutionary guard but he worked for the c.i.a. today he's sharing his story with the "fox report"'s jonathan hunt. a double agent in his own words. as "studio b" continues in just 90 seconds. ifs are ♪ my sunglasses. ♪ people say i'm forgetf. maybe that's why we go to so many memorable places. love the road you're on. the subaru outback. motor trend's 2010 sport/utility of the year. after claiming he worked for years as a double agent for the c.i.a. he grew up in iran and claims he grew suspicion of the regime and then on a trip to the united states he got in touch with american intelligence. what followed, a life of danger under co
, the first one is a phoenix police officer whose name is david salgado, a native-born u.s. citizen of mexican ancestry. his opposition to sb 1070 is based on several broad constitutional arguments. one is that the law violates the 14th amendment, which guarantees minorities full rights as u.s. citizens. the other claim is that the law conflicts with what's known as the supremacy clause of the constitution. he argue sths that it gives the federal government, not state and local police forces authority over immigration laws. he also says that the law is having a chilling effect on his first amendment rights to speak out against it. tj? >> well, casey, what does, i guess this also has to be kind of torn. because this is an officer of the law who wants to uphold the law, of course, but he's been asked to uphold a law that he doesn't quite frankly believe in. >> right, and officer salgado said he's in a dilemma and plans to not enforce the law because he believes it's unconstitutional. here's the dilemma, he said that could subject him to discipline from his employer, the phoenix police department
some portions of a confidential study of conditions before the rig disaster. also, was the u.s. duped by an iranian scientist who may have been working as a double agent? i'll talk about that and a lot more with the former cia insider. the outed operative valerie plame wilson. >>> an openly gay soldier and outspoken critic of the don't ask don't tell policy has revealed today he's been formally discharged from the united states army. lieutenant dan choy, a west point grad, was arrested for handcuffing himself to a gate in protest of banning gays from the military. i'm sure that lieutenant choy knew this was coming. he had been removed for some time. only a matter of time before he was formally discharged, i assume. >> reporter: yeah, wolf. we spoke with lieutenant choy this afternoon, and he knew it was coming, but he told us, quote, you know, you prepare yourself. he said i had built up an armor, but it's still an emotional roller coaster. now, lieutenant choi says he just got a phone call today from his battalion commander letting him know about the discharge, but, you know, when i
was in pakistan today, emphasizing the u.s. commitment there. she announced several new projects as part of a $7.5 billion aid effort. she then travelled to kabul for international security conference on the afghanistan war. before leaving pakistan, clinton talked to greta van susteren and she thinks, clinton thinks someone in that government of pakistan knows where osama bin laden is. >> if there were a terrorist network operating somewhere, even in the remote place in the united states, some sheriff, you know, some local state policeman, somebody in our collective government would probably know that there was something suspicious going on. so that's why i assume somebody, somebody in this government from top to bottom does know where bin laden is. i'd like to know, too. >> bret: tune in, 10:00 p.m. eastern time for on the record with greta to see her exclusive interview with secretary clinton. security in afghanistan has been heightened in advance of the security conference mrs. clinton is attending. thousands of soldiers and police have been deployed to kabul. two u.s. soldiers were killed by
the war in afghanistan became the longest war in u.s. history, surpassing the conflict in vietnam. >>> a major discovery at ground zero today in new york. a relic which appears to be a ship dating from the 18th century was found by workers at the world trade center site in lower manhattan. the 32-foot long hull, timber samples will be sent to a laboratory to help get a sense of exactly when the boat was built. archaeologists are racing to record and analyze the ship before the delicate wood now exposed to air begins to deteriorate. >>> it's been dormant for 75 years, and a dangerous infection hits a popular florida tourist destination. experts say warning, this could spread north. we'll tell you what it is ahead. >>> another brand new explosive audiotape reportedly of actor mel gibson lashing out at his ex-girlfriend and there are new accusations that gibson injured their baby. if this case is is domestic violence, how do you address it? we'll be right back. tlemen, the 57th president of the united states. ♪ ♪ ♪ [ bell rings ] ♪ [ male announcer ] at&t. the nation's fastes
the u.s. military of murder. here's the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff admiral mike mullen. >> i think we always need to be mindful of the unknown potential for damage in any particular document that we handle. mr. assange can say whatever he likes about the greater good he thinks he and his source are doing, but the truth is they might already have on their hands the blood of some young soldier or that of an afghan family. >> wikileaks' founder refuses to say how his site got the documents. but nothing is secret on the internet. the military may have a hacker, a convicted criminal from california, to thank for cracking this case. his name is adran lamo, just 29 years old. in 2004 he was convicted of breaking into "the new york times," microsoft and lexus nexus computers. he went to the federal government to show the leaking. the website might also face chinl charges. barbara starr has the latest developments in our next hour. >>> so where's all the spilled oil? the coast guard insists it can't find much more to clean up on the surface of the gulf. their crews keep conducting fly
copia county. >>> a milestone in the afghan war. july now the deadliest month in the war for u.s. troops. more people are asking, is this fight worth the cost? >>> and we are coming back. that is president obama's message for the auto industry. we're tracking his trip aimed at boosting the big three. >>> but first, you have got to see this. this is one congressman saying he's not taking it anymore. here is what he said. anthony weiner, congressman of new york said today, maybe the brooklyn in me came out. he's referring to what happened last night on the flash of the house of representatives after a bill that he co sponsored didn't make it for procedural reasons. listen to him in his own words. >> the gentleman from new york is recognized. >> mr. speaker, i yield one minute to the distinguished gentleman from new york, mr. weiner. >> great courage, to wait until all members have already spoken and then stand up and wrap your arms around procedure. we see it in the united states' senate every day where members say we want amendments, we want debate, but we're still a no. and then we stand
spill operations. former u.s. attorney general alberto gonzalez will not be charged in the firings of nine u.s. attorneys under the bush administration. after a 22 month investigation, the justice department ruled there's insufficient evidence to establish that he and his staff made misleading statements. this was not criminal. if they were political, that was not the crime. gonzalez resigned after that controversy. ineptitude and confusion, that's how they are describing officials at massy energy in the months before the explosion at a west virginia mine. that killed 29 men. they are all part of a rebuttal to massy's claim that the government forced them to make changes to reduce the volume of fresh air in the mine before the blast. the company's conduct is under federal investigation. secretary of state hillary clinton is in hanoi, vietnam this morning. she's attending an asian summit meeting where the buzz is the new sanctions she's announced against north korea. the north koreans responded by declaring the u.s. should drop the sanctions and cancel next week's military maneuvers
, it will definitely destroy this country from within. bill: so we know the u.s. now struggling to keep its head above financial waters. leaning on countries like china to buy our debt. stuart varney is anchor of varney & company on the fox business network. good morning. whenner skin bowles -- when erskine bowles says that, what does it tell new. >> it's onnous for the future. mr. bowles is saying come on, you can't go on like this but number two, he's vee -- revealed two new possibilities which are on the table as far as the commission is concerned, those two possibilities are, number one, limiting the mortgage interest deduction. that's huge. that is a mainstay of middle america, and the deduction which they get for the interest they pay on their mortgage. maybe that could be limited as a way of raising more revenue for the government. number two, possibly means testing medicare. in other words, you don't get it if you make too much money or you work too -- or you're worth too much money. those are two bomb shells, ominous bomb shells placed on the table over the weekend as to what we should or cou
leaders trying to encourage them to cooperate closely with u.s. and afghanistan in fight against al-qaeda and taliban. it will be ahead of summit in kabul. in kabul, three civilians and others were wounded in eastern part of city. primary goal of the clinton visit to afghanistan is refine the mission of the 9-year-old war to show leadership from the administration. what can they do to regain confidence? >> hi to you. secretary clinton tells pakistani officials she needs their help to win the war to afghanistan. to get pakistan on board, she will announce billions of dollars that u.s. will funnel to pakistan for water and energy projects. the trip comes as richard hoss, head of council of foreign relations tells newsweek the u.s. needs to rethink afghanistan, we're not winning and it's not worth it. suggesting a drawdown of troops and here is an exempt -- >> haass is a well-respected voice, former advisor for powecolin powell so it will complicate things for clinton and the administration, but others say it's not the time to leave. >> it's a difficult conflict. the risk to pull out w
and everyone's." as u.s. troops move out iraq, many more are moving into afghanistan. one of the best-seller lists on the "the new york times" best seller list, the laura bush biography is that no. 5. no. 12, "change your brain, change your body." "born to run," is no. 13. we encourage you to check out booktv.org in our weekend programming on c-span 2. taking a look at the other issues and guests making up the sunday morning conversation, bobby jackson. caller: the white house and congressional agenda, congress is returning this week. the midterm elections and the gulf coast oil spill. the guests on "meet the press" include robert gibbs. on abc this week, talking with david axelrod. luis gutierrez and bryan bill bread. the guests on "fox news sunday," hosted by chris wallace, david axelrod and jon kyle, as well as an interview with benjamin netanyahu. on "face the nation" on cbs, eric holder. on cnn's "state of the union," guests include david axelrod, new mexico governor bill richardson, a trend frank, and kenneth feinberg, administrator of the gulf coast oil spill victims compensati
is creating jobs. then he will attend fundraisers for the u.s. senate candidate. he is the democratic hopeful to face republican senator kit bond who is retiring. off to vegas where the president will stump for majority leader harry reid. a plane powered completely by the sun landed this morning in switzerland. it took off from the same airfield 24 hours ago. the four engine aircraft has 12,000 solar cells on their wings. they were able to absorb enough light during the day to keep the plane going at night. the ultimate plan, to fly the plane around the world. >> that is so cool. save money on gas. all right. let's talk a little bit about this. well, it was supposed to be the 28th annual time that governors from the u.s. and the mexican side of the border as well get together to discuss all their problems. but jan brewer who is set to host it in phoenix got some bad news. a bunch of the governors from mexico said, you know what? we're gonna boycott. she in turn said, hold it. you can't boycott because i'm going to cancel it. well, now -- >> you can't fire me, i quit. >> here's the problem, th
to widespread racial profiling by arizona law enforcement officers. they worry it will lead to harassment of u.s. citizens and of legal residents of the united states because of the way they look or the language they speak. the second lawsuit being heard in the afternoon is by the obama administration the basic premise of that lawsuit is that they say the federal government not states has the exclusive authority to regulate immigration law. they say the state of arizona has no legitimate interest in passing a law regulating immigration. arizona governor jan brewer filed a response to those lawsuits. she says the state will suffer irreparable harm if this law is not allowed to go into effect. because she says the federal government has not done its job in terms of securing the border and controlling rampant smuggling that continues to plague the state of arizona. we spoke to homeland security secretary janet napolitano, the former governor of arizona and the woman responsible for u.s. border security. she says that she understands the frustrations of arizona residents but she says this law is mis
in the courts and on the streets? also more than 100 days of disaster. the worst spill in u.s. history marks a milestone. and we're asking the tough questions about how and why so much oil seems to have vanished. >>> and art in the white house from every angle. join me on a fascinating tour of historic paintings, antiques and did he cure that presidents get to see and enjoy every day. welcome to our viewers in the united states and around the world. wolf blitzer is off. i'm suzanne malveaux and you're in "the situation room." >>> arizona's controversial immigration law went into effect as scheduled this week. minus key provisions blocked by federal judge. now no one in the state seems satisfied. governor jan brewer quickly launched an appeal of the ruling. and opponents of the crackdown launched a series of street protests leading to a number of arrests. both sides are preparing for the next round of the legal fight. i spoke with cnn's senior legal analyst jeffrey toobin about the ruling by u.s. district judge susan bolton which focused on the most controversial elements of the law. jeff, we
? >> they allowed the prisoner transfer agreement. >> it is not case closed. >> u.s. lawmakers say we may get some answers after all. plus one passenger says the plane just dropped right out of the sky. >> i saw at least two people hit the ceiling. drinks were flying. >> tonight, terror at 30,000 feet. >> and what the bleep? blago gave us his word. >> i want to promise the people of illinois i'm going to testify. when i testify, which i will, and i can't wait to testify to set the record straight. >> but tonight, a bombshell on planet blago. >> the biggest lesson i've learned is that i talk too much. >> who taught him that? >> governor -- >> and how will he clear his name now? but first from fox this wednesday night, the white house apologizing to the african-american woman who says she was forced to resign from her job at the department of agriculture after a comment she made appeared on the internet. on a web site that posted an edited video with her comments about race taken out of context and leading to what the white house is now calling an injustice. she is shirley sherrod. she gave a
of responsibility in the deadly bombings of crowds watching the world cup final game on tv in uganda. now the u.s. is offering to help. and a son's dna leads police to find and arrest his father. an exclusive look at the technology that cracked the grim sleeper killings over two decades later. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." look at these live pictures from the gulf of mexico. at any moment we could see a new cap lowered into place over the leaking bp oil well. this is a critical step that could possibly, possibly seal off the gusher, at least temporarily for the first time in 84 days. cnn's ed levendara is joining us live from new orleans. ed, take us through this right now. >> reporter: the latest information we have is that new containment cap is moving so closely to the top of the blowout preventer so we're really looking intently at what will happen over the next 48 hours as soon as that cap is in place. they will begin a series of what they describe as integrity testing to determine whether or not that cap will essentially be able to do what they hope it does. essentially,
, by the way, set to take effect a week from today unless a judge intervenes, u.s. district judge susan bolton on screen will hear argument necessary that matter, the federal government saying that law signed by the governor january brewer -- jan brewer trafrels on federal law for immigration. that's here live. >>> another fox news alert now in the u.s. economy and this is not good, 464,000 americans filing new claims week. that's a jump from the previous week and the latest numbers out just a day after the fed reserve chairman ben bernanki offered a not so positive assessment of happening in our economy and what is expected. good morning, everybody, i'm bill hemmer, welcome to "america's newsroom". good morning, martha. martha: good to see you as always, i'm martha maccallum. as bill was saying, ben bernanke told congress yesterday the economy is, quote, uncertain and fragile. those are not exactly the words the market wants to hear. is uncertain and frag jill. he didn't really get nailed down on whether or not he believes we will fall back into a recession. a lot of double-dip talk. >> and w
will be with us here in the studio. breaking news overnight. it's grim. >> very grim. breaking news. three u.s. troops killed in afghanistan yesterday making july the deadliest month for american forces in the nearly nine-year war. nato officials say the troops died in two separate blasts in the southern part of the country. according to an associated press count that brings the u.s. death toll for the month to at least 63. june had been the deadliest month for the u.s. with 60 deaths and for the overall nato led force with 104 fatalities. meanwhile a new report on the increase in army suicides finds the military is failing its soldiers as they deal with repeated deployments to afghanistan and iraq. according to the army study, military commanders are so focused on preparing their troops for war, they are allowing them to engage in risky behavior back here at home like drug and alcohol abuse that may lead to suicide. the army counted 160 suicides last year, the highest total ever. a senate report reveals as many as 6,600 graves may be unmarked or mislabeled at arlington national cemetery. a pr
pakistanis that the u.s. is concerned with their welfare, and not just focused on fighting terrorists. later today, clinton travels to kabul to take part in a one-day international summit on afghanistan's future. >>> after two years of delays the boeing 787 dream liner has made its international debut. the much-anticipated jumbo jet touched down on british soil yesterday after a test flight from seattle just in time for the annual air show. the dream liner claims to be lighter and greener than its rivals. boeing hopes to deliver its first dream line tore a japanese airline by the enof the year. >>> buff germany's busiest highways came to a screeching halt all in the name of culture. nearly 40 miles of the autobahn was shut down to vehicles and transformed into a performance venue. some 3 million people turned out for the cultural festival which featured a giant table made up of 20,000 individual tables. kind of cool there. anyone who wanted to was invited to perform. >> that's actually very cool, to close off that much of the street. >> speaking of cool, a bit of bubbly for divers in finland
under u.s. legislation passed last year tripling civilian aid to $7.5 billion over the next five years, secretary clinton hopes to draw the two countries closer in trust and strengthen their joint efforts to fight al-qaida and the taliban. >> this is the most significant, concrete achievement between these two neighbors in nearly 50 years. i believe it will go a long way towards strengthening regional economic ties, creating jobs in both countries and promoting sustainable economic development. >> and the foreign minister for pakistan explained the country's leadership is encouraged by the dialogue between the two nations adding that it is important to build a people centered relationship. such a partnership, he says, is essential to fighting terrorism and extremism. pakistan is undergoing many changes right now, he added. economic and socially adding that it is a country that's moving towards democracy and pakistan's foreign minister adds they have two priorities. peace and prosperity. becoming a partner in the international community. later today, as you mentioned, ali, secretary c
in afghanistan is more violent than ever. last month was the deadliest for u.s. troops. and more afghan civilians are dying than ever before. and as more americans die in afghanistan, more americans back home are questioning the war. in december, 52% said the war was worth fighting. today, that number is 43%. the increased fighting has a lot to do with it. as fewer troops die in iraq, support for that war has increased. up 8 points to 42%. but right now, americans are deeply concerned about whether both wars are worth it. the u.s. has spent $1 trillion in iraq and afghanistan. and more than 5,500 men and women have been killed. but still, only about half say the iraq and afghanistan wars have improved long-term american security. the fear for the u.s. in afghanistan, the next few months will only get more violent. and that could further erode u.s. support. >> we're engaged in a contest of wills. our enemies are doing all they can to undermine the confidence of the afghan people. >> reporter: and support in a lot of the skepticism comes from president obama's own party. whereas 57% of republicans
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